Stephen Kenny

History Professor, University of Regina

Stephen Kenny

Stephen Kenny
History Professor, University of Regina

Professor of History, Department of History, Campion College, University of Regina, Stephen Kenny teaches in the fields of British North America, Canadian-American Relations, Contemporary Quebec and the Historical Relationship of French and English speakers in Canada. He has published numerous scholarly articles in both English and French which have appeared in Canada’s pre-eminent journals of history such as the Canadian Historical Review and La Revue d’histoire de l’Amérique française. His work is also found in the American Review of Canadian Studies as well as journals in France and Japan.

He has worked, researched and lived for extended periods in the United States, France, Japan and Spain as well as in the Canadian provinces of Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Saskatchewan.

Stephen was invited as a visiting professor of Canadian history at Kwansei Gakuin University in Nishinomiya Japan (1987-1988). He directed the University of Vermont’s  ‘Vermont Overseas Studies Program’  (VOSP)  at l’Université de Nice (1980-1981). In a very early stage of his career he taught English for a year at l’École polyvalente Louis-Philippe Paré in Châteauguay Centre Quebec (1971-1972). Here was his baptism of fire in the language of Quebec.

As a cultural historian his most recent research focus is the historically verifiable phenomenon of anti-Catholicism in North America. He has lectured on this subject in this country, France, Ireland and the United States. Antagonism and hostility towards Roman Catholicism in North America was at its deepest and most violent in what Americans refer to as the antebellum period before the Civil War. He was struck by the remarkable difference of the experience of Catholics in Canada. In the United States as churches burned, Catholics were excoriated and countless books and tracts were published hostile to their very place in the Republic, Canada offered a very different reality. At this same moment, the time of Confederation, Canadians were doing a deal which accommodated equally obvious and deep differences of language, culture and religion. For this very reason he is delighted to participate in this reflection upon the approaching sesquicentennial of Confederation for its accomplishment, remarkable in itself, also illustrates the unique and admirable insight of what exactly it means to be Canadian.

Born and bred in Chatham, Ontario. Married to Françoise Pâquet, a son Nicolas and a daughter Annelies. His first language is English. He speaks, reads and writes fairly well in French. He can survive in Spanish.